Anonymous Q&A

Due to a high volume of submitted questions, it is impossible for Family Planning Plus to answer every question. Please check the frequently asked questions (FAQ) page to see if the answer to your question might be found there before submitting a question. If you do submit a question and do not see the answer to that question within a few days, please call one of our offices or contact your regular medical provider. Finally, the information included on this page should never replace a medical consultation, nor should it ever be used to make a diagnosis on your own. Please see a medical provider of your choice if you are experiencing any symptoms or require more detailed medical advice.

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Q: I had brown discharge starting about a week before i was suppose to have my period, (the last two days having a very small amount of blood along with the brown) it has stopped for a few days now, and soon as it did i began cramping off and on. My period is about ten days late. I almost always have protected sex, but about three weeks ago, or a little less, my boyfriend did the pull out method; i’ve taken two pregnancy test the day of, and three days after my missed period. I’ve read brown discharge could either be old blood from a tear, early signs of pregnancy, or something along the lines of my menstrual blood staying in there too long and therefore turning brown. So, my question would be how do i know for sure exactly what it is going on with me?

Wait two more weeks and then repeat the pregnancy test. Menstrual irregularities (including missed periods) can occur for a number of different reasons. Pregnancy is just one possibility.  Irregular periods can be caused by hormonal imbalances, perimenopause, illness or infection, use of certain medications, and other more serious conditions.  Women who are dieting or exercising excessively may also skip periods. In addition, increased stress levels and changes in routine may affect the regularity of menstrual cycles.  If you skip more than one period and you are not using a progestin-only method of birth control, she should probably be evaluated by a medical professional to determine the cause.

In the meantime, if you do not wish to be pregnant, please don’t continue to have unprotected sex. Either abstain from sex or use birth control. If you are interested in starting a method of birth control and you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment.  We can talk with you about all of your contraceptive options and help you choose one that best fits your lifestyle. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: If I had Unprotected sex 18 days ago, April 2nd..& I have taken 6 pregnancy test during this week all negative but one and if sperm last up to 5 days then as soon as we had sex..i began ovulation the next 5days later….could i be pregnant

Since you had unprotected sex and since one of your pregnancy tests was positive, you very well could be pregnant. Call the medical provider of your choice for a pregnancy test. Be ready to tell them the first day of your last menstrual period so they can schedule your test at the appropriate time. Most urine pregnancy tests are not reliable until you are at least one week late for your period. If you haven’t missed a period yet, you may want to wait to see if it comes before making an appointment.

If you do not wish to be pregnant, please don’t continue to have unprotected sex. Either abstain from sex or use birth control. If you are interested in starting a method of birth control and you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment.  We can talk with you about all of your contraceptive options and help you choose one that best fits your lifestyle. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

If you are planning a pregnancy, the following tips can help ensure a positive pregnancy outcome.

  • Schedule a pre-pregnancy appointment with your doctor.  Let your doctor know you are planning a pregnancy.  Your doctor will review your family health history, be sure you have the proper immunizations, review your medications, schedule any needed tests, and discuss your present health behaviors/lifestyle and recommend changes.
  • Begin taking a daily multivitamin with 400 mcg of folic acid ( a B vitamin that prevents birth defects of the brain and spine).
  • If you smoke, quit and avoid second-hand smoke.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages.
  • If you use street drugs, stop using them, and check with a doctor before using prescription or over-the-counter medications (some medications are not safe to use during pregnancy).
  • Eat healthfully and maintain a healthy weight.
  • Be sure to get regular preventive medical care.
  • Reduce the amount of stress in your life (if possible).
  • Get regular exercise.  Walking, swimming, stretching, and housework are all good exercise choices before and during pregnancy.
  • Once you are pregnant, get early and regular pre-natal care.

  Good luck!

Q: i’v been having unprotected sex and i don’t start my period for another 2 more week’s but for some reason i’m spotting , what does this mean?

It could be ovulation spotting (some women experience a bit of light spotting when they ovulate), or you may be pregnant and it could be implantation spotting. If you are a week or more late for your next period, take a pregnancy test. Use first morning urine for the best results. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

If you do not wish to be pregnant, please don’t continue to have unprotected sex. Either abstain from sex or use a condom from start to finish for each act of sexual intercourse. If you are interested in starting a hormonal method of birth control and you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment to discuss your contraceptive options. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

If you are planning a pregnancy, the following tips can help to ensure a healthy pregnancy outcome:

  • Schedule a pre-pregnancy appointment with your doctor.  Let your doctor know you are planning a pregnancy.  Your doctor will review your family health history, be sure you have the proper immunizations, review your medications, schedule any needed tests, and discuss your present health behaviors/lifestyle and recommend changes.
  • Begin taking a daily multivitamin with 400 mcg of folic acid ( a B vitamin that prevents birth defects of the brain and spine).
  • Quit smoking and avoid second-hand smoke.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages.
  • Stop using street drugs, and check with a doctor before using prescription or over-the-counter medications (some medications are not safe to use during pregnancy).
  • Eat healthfully and maintain a healthy weight.
  • Be sure to get regular preventive medical care.
  • Reduce the amount of stress in your life (if possible).
  • Get regular exercise.  Walking, swimming, stretching, and housework are all good exercise choices before and during pregnancy.
  • Once you are pregnant, be sure to get early and regular pre-natal care.

Good luck!

Q: Me and this guy had sex a week ago, he used a condom the first time but the second time did not and said he didnt cum. 2 days later I went and took the plan b pill. what are the chances that I will get pregnant?

 Unfortunately, I can’t give you a percentage. The chances of your being pregnant are dependent on a number of different things. Some of these include the number of times one has intercourse (of course, the more times you have unprotected intercourse, the greater the chance of pregnancy) and the timing of the intercourse in relationship to your menstrual cycle. You are less likely to become pregnant if the intercourse occurred just before, during, or just after your menstrual period, and more likely to become pregnant if it occurred mid-cycle. Since you used Plan B within 72 hours of the unprotected sex, you reduced your risk of pregnancy. According to the manufacturer, the treatment prevents seven of eight pregnancies that otherwise would have occurred. If your partner urinated between the two acts of sexual intercourse (thereby washing away any sperm from the previous ejaculation left in the urethra) and truly did not ejaculate during the second act, your risk of pregnancy would be extremely low.

One of the most common side effects of Plan B use is menstrual irregularity.  Therefore, your next period could be earlier than usual, later than usual, or spotty (meaning you may bleed for a few days, stop, and then bleed some more). However, if you are a week or more late for your period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

Plan B should not be used as a regular method of birth control as it is less effective than other methods.  If you are going to continue to have sexual contact, you may want to think about using a regular form of birth control.  If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment to discuss your contraceptive options. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: I just started taking birth control and I am confused out of my mind on what could be going on with me so here is my story. I started taking Loestrin 24Fe the Sunday after I started my period. I started my period on a Thursday and started to take the pill that Sunday. I was told to wait 7days to have unprotected sex however I had sex without a condom or spermicide on the 6th and 7th day of taking the pill. I took the pill everyday at 10pm for about a week then for about 3 days I had to take it at 8pm. Right after that I went back to 10pm, after that happened I started to spot dark brown for about 3 weeks on and off. Then I had unprotected sex again the day second day I started placebo pills. I did not get my period but I continued with my second pack anyway 2 days into the new pack I spotted bright pink/orange and had minor cramps and have not spotted since. I still haven’t started my period and I’m going into my second week of my new pack. My question is, is what I am going through normal for the birth control or could I be pregnant?

Pregnancy is possible since you had unprotected sex during your first week of pills. However, since you started your pills with your period, it is unlikely that you would have ovulated that early in your cycle.

Menstrual irregularities are very common during the first three months of pill use. These irregularities include missed periods, breakthrough bleeding (bleeding in between periods), and spotting. It is normal to experience some mild cramping when you are bleeding or spotting. You can also expect your periods to be much lighter and of shorter duration than they normally are. If your periods do not become more regular by your fourth pack of pills, contact the provider who prescribed your pill. 

Continue to take your pills as directed. Just to be on the safe side, take a pregnancy test. Use first morning urine for the best results. If it is negative, you have nothing to worry about. Do not stop taking your pills unless you test positive for pregnancy.

Q: i was treated for chlamydia & 48hrs later i had protected sex but the condom broke my partner was treated also but had no symptoms or signs of it can i be reinfected even thought i had to wait 72hrs after the cure?

Yes, reinfection is possible. If your partner was not infected, you may have infected him/her. Contact the medical provider who treated your chlamydia for further instruction. They may want to retreat both you and your partner.

Q: i had the removal ove my implant removed on monday past, on tuesday me and my boyfriend had unprotected sex and again on thursday, on friday i noticed a spot of blood and nomral stomach pains but there wanst much blood, its saturday now and there is’nt much blood eithur not like there use to be, is this my body coming around again from having it removed or am i pregnant?

Pregnancy is possible, but it could just be your body adjusting to the new level of hormones since you just had the implant removed.

If you are one week or more late for your next period, take a pregnancy test. Use first morning urine for the best results. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

In the meantime, if you do not wish to be pregnant, do not contine to have unprotected sex. Either abstain from sex or use condoms from start to finish for each act of sexual intercourse.

You may want to start another method of birth control for better protection. If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment. We can talk with you about all of your contraceptive options and help you choose one that best suits your lifestyle. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

If you are planning a pregnancy, it would be best to switch to condoms until your periods become more regular. Most experts advise women using hormonal methods to wait at least three months after stopping their method before attempting pregnancy.  Although the hormones are very quickly passed from your system, this time period will allow you to resume regular menstrual cycles so a pregnancy can be dated.  This also allows the uterine lining to thicken and provide a better site for the placenta to implant and grow.

Q: i just started using the nuvaring birthcontrol and my boyfriend accidently ejaculated in me because the condom broke and this happened on the same day i first started using it , is there a chance i can get pregnant? or should i take a plan b pill?

Yes, pregnancy is possible and using Plan B is recommended.

Plan B One-step is a pill you can take after unprotected sex to reduce the risk of pregnancy. It works best if it is used within the first 24 hours after sex but can be used up to 120 hours (or five days) after unprotected sex with decreased effects after the first three days.  The sooner you use Plan B, the more effective it is.

Plan B works by delaying ovulation (the monthly release of an egg), and possibly by interfering with fertilization (the union of sperm and egg) and implantation (when the fertilized egg implants itself into the uterine lining). If you are already pregnant, it will not terminate the pregnancy. According to the manufacturer, the treatment prevents seven of eight pregnancies that otherwise would have occurred.

If you are 17 or older, you can purchase Plan B at most drug stores without a prescription. You will need to ask the pharmacist for Plan B as it is located behind the counter. You may also need to show ID to prove your age. Plan B is around $50. If you are under 17, you will need a prescription from a doctor. You can also get Plan B from a Family Planning or Planned Parenthood clinic. We offer Plan B at all of our clinics at a reduced cost. Some individuals qualify for free services.

One of the most common side effects of Plan B use is menstrual irregularity.  Therefore, your next period could be earlier than usual, later than usual, or spotty (meaning you may bleed for a few days, stop, and then bleed some more). However, if you are a week or more late for your period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

Condoms work best when they are used correctly and consistently. Here are some tips for correct condom use.

  • Always check the expiration date to be sure it is not expired prior to use.
  • Condoms should be stored at room temperature in a sharps free environment.
  • Never use an oil-based lubricant with a latex condom. If you need additional lubricant, use a water-based type like KY Jelly or Astroglide.
  • Pinch the tip of the condom between the thumb and forefinger while rolling it onto the erect penis to ensure that there is no air pocket in the tip of the condom.
  • Smooth out the sides of the condom once it has been rolled on to ensure there are no air pockets in the sides of the condom.
  • Hold onto the rim or base of the condom while removing the penis from the vagina to prevent it from slipping off inside the vagina during removal.
  • Do not have any penis-vagina contact without a condom.

Q: Do you need a parent to get an abortion if you are under eighteen? I’m pregnant, and I don’t want a fetus growing inside of me and stealing my precious nutrients. I’m thirteen, and I need an abortion, can I buy it myself, or do I need my parent to do it. Again, I do not want a nasty parasitic fetus stealing the nutrients from my body, help me. Please.

Each state has different laws. In Pennsylvania (as in many other states), anyone under the age of 18 must have the permission of one parent to get an abortion. If you feel you can’t ask either of your parents or if neither of your parents will give you their permission, you have the option of going before a judge to obtain an abortion. This is called a judicial bypass.

Regardless of the laws, it would be helpful if you had someone older to talk to. If you could approach one of your parents about your pregnancy, that would be ideal. If not, try to find an adult that you trust – an older sibling, an aunt, a teacher, anyone who might be able to give you some help and support during this difficult time. If you truly feel that you have no one that you can confide in, contact the closest Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office. Make an appointment for a pregnancy test and options counseling. They should be able to help you sort through the laws in your state and will give you information about all of your options, including referrals to other agencies/facilities who can help you. You can also call the CHOICE hotline (1-800-848-3367) for referrals to facilities that provide options counseling. 

If you live in another state, there may be different laws. You can find out about the laws in your state by visiting the following website/reading the following document (second page):

http://www.guttmacher.org/statecenter/spibs/spib_PIMA.pdf

For information about the judicial bypass (obtaining an abortion without a parent’s consent via the court system) in Pennsylvania, contact the Women’s Law Project at 1-215-928-9801. For more information about PA abortion laws, visit:

http://www.jlc.org/resources/fact-sheets/young-women%E2%80%99s-reproductive-rightsabortion-pennsylvania

http://www.womenslawproject.org/brochures/wlp_teen_piece.pdf

 

 

Q: I had sexual intercourse on the night of February 24, and afterwards my labia had swollen up and were inflamed and burned, ever since that night, everytime that I have sex it hurts afterwards, why? Should I be concerned?

If you only feel the burning sensation and experience the swelling right after sex, your symptoms may be a result of physically rough sex. If so, you will need to talk with your partner about being a bit gentler during intercourse. If you are using condoms, you might be allergic to the particular brand your partner is using. Try changing brands. Perhaps you are not lubricated sufficiently. You might try using some water-based lubricant like KY jelly or astroglide prior to sex and as needed during sex.

However, if you have these symptoms between acts of sexual intercourse, you might have some type of infection. Since you have been experiencing this swelling and burning sensation for two months now, you should be evaluated by a medical professional just to be sure it’s not something more serious. If you have a regular doctor that you go to for your reproductive health, please call him or her and make an appointment. If you don’t and you live near one of our offices, please call us to make an appointment for an infection check. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you. Gynecologists/Family Planning/Planned Parenthood providers take care of these types of problems all the time so there is no reason to be embarrassed.

Q: ok so i had unprotected sex and im not sure if the guy busted in me because he told me to finish him by oral and promised he wouldnt get me pregnant but just to be safe i went 14 hours later and took the morning after pill. should i be okay and not pregnant?

Using the morning after pill was smart thinking. Even if the guy does not ejaculate inside, pregnancy is still possible because of pre-seminal fluid (also called pre-ejaculate).  Pre-seminal fluid leaks out of the penis prior to ejaculation.  Sometimes this fluid contains sperm that is left in the urethra from a previous ejaculation.  

Plan B works by delaying ovulation (the monthly release of an egg), and possibly by interfering with fertilization (the union of sperm and egg) and implantation (when the fertilized egg implants itself into the uterine lining). If you are already pregnant, it will not terminate the pregnancy. Plan B works best if it is used within the first 24 hours after unprotected sex. Since you used the morning after pill in a timely fashion, you will receive maximum effectivenss. Unfortunately, it is not a guarantee that you won’t become pregnant. According to the manufacturer, the treatment prevents seven of eight pregnancies that otherwise would have occurred.

One of the most common side effects of Plan B use is menstrual irregularity.  Therefore, your next period could be earlier than usual, later than usual, or spotty (meaning you may bleed for a few days, stop, and then bleed some more). However, if you are a week or more late for your period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

Plan B should not be used as a regular method of birth control as it is less effective than other methods.  If you are going to continue to have sexual contact, you may want to think about using a regular form of birth control.  If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment to discuss your contraceptive options. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: so my boyfriend and i haven’t had sex in a few weeks due to certain circumstances. last night we tried again and it hurt/burned. same with this morning. i thought maybe it was an irritation from shaving or something and i tried to spray water down there to clean it out, but even the water kind of hurt in this one area. i checked and one side is pinker than the other (which is also the side that hurts a little more) other than that everything looks fine. what should i do/what could it be?

You really need to be evaluated by a medical professional.  It could be something as simple as a yeast infection, but it could be something more serious. If you have a regular doctor that you go to for your reproductive health, please call him or her and make an appointment. If you don’t and you live near one of our offices, please call us to make an appointment for an infection check. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you. Gynecologists/Family Planning/Planned Parenthood providers take care of these types of problems all the time so there is no reason to be embarrassed.

Q: if a Man and a Women have sex and He doesn’t cum in Her the first time They have sex but They wait for 5 or 10 minutes and He cums in Her that time what are the chances of Me being pregnant please reply as soon as possible! Thanks .

It’s impossible to give you a percentage. While his sperm count probably was lower during the second ejaculation, it only takes one sperm to fertilize an egg. It also depend on the timing of the intercourse in relationship to your menstrual cycle. If the intercourse occurred around the time of your ovulation (the monthly release of an egg), the risk of pregnancy would be higher. If the intercourse occurred just before, during, or just after your menstrual period, the risk of pregnancy would be lower.

If you are worried about pregnancy and it has been less than 5 days since the intercourse occurred, you could use Plan B to reduce your risk. Plan B One-step is a pill you can take after unprotected sex to reduce the risk of pregnancy. It works best if it is used within the first 24 hours after sex but can be used up to 120 hours (or five days) after unprotected sex with decreased effects after the first three days.  The sooner you use Plan B, the more effective it is.

Plan B works by delaying ovulation (the monthly release of an egg), and possibly by interfering with fertilization (the union of sperm and egg) and implantation (when the fertilized egg implants itself into the uterine lining). If you are already pregnant, it will not terminate the pregnancy. According to the manufacturer, the treatment prevents seven of eight pregnancies that otherwise would have occurred.

If you are 17 or older, you can purchase Plan B at most drug stores without a prescription. You will need to ask the pharmacist for Plan B as it is located behind the counter. You may also need to show ID to prove your age. Plan B is around $50. If you are under 17, you will need a prescription from a doctor. You can also get Plan B from a Family Planning or Planned Parenthood clinic. We offer Plan B at all of our clinics at a reduced cost. Some individuals qualify for free services.

One of the most common side effects of Plan B use is menstrual irregularity.  Therefore, your next period could be earlier than usual, later than usual, or spotty (meaning you may bleed for a few days, stop, and then bleed some more).

Regardless of whether or not you use Plan B, if you are a week or more late for your next period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

Please remember that Plan B should not be used as a regular method of birth control as it is less effective than other methods.  If you are going to continue to have sexual contact, you may want to think about using a regular form of birth control.  If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment to discuss your contraceptive options. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: im on seasonuiqe bc pill. i started it the day of my period. when i got off my period i had sex a few days later we did use a condom. but my question is when we was done i saw a brown discharge an my stomach feels like my period is about to start over again does this mean im pregnant

Whenever you start a new hormonal method of birth control, menstrual irregularities are quite common for the first three months or so (until your body adjusts to the new hormone levels).  These irregularities can include missed periods, breakthrough bleeding (bleeding in between periods), and spotting (brown or light pink). Sometimes the bleeding is accompanied by mild cramping. Since you are using a method that will give you four periods a year, spotting or bleeding between periods  can sometimes occur beyond the initial three months. If you had taken at least seven of your active pills prior to the intercourse, pregnancy is highly unlikely (especially since you also used a condom).

Q: I had unprotected sex with my boyfriend 1 week ago and he came inside me. I am on the implanon since 2010 but this time i was really drunk. Could i get pregnant?

While alcohol can impair your judgment and make you do things that you wouldn’t normally do, it does not have any effect on Implanon’s ability to protect you from pregnancy. Implanon is over 99% effective and once it is inserted, it remains effective for up to three years (early removal may be indicated for women who are overweight). Unfortunately, no birth control method is 100% effective, but Implanon is one of the most effective methods.

Q: my boyfriend came in me two days in a row amd im not on borth control… what are the chances of pregnancy?

Unfortunately, I can’t give you a percentage. The chances of your being pregnant are dependent on a number of different things. Some of these include the number of times one has intercourse (of course, the more times you have unprotected intercourse, the greater the chance of pregnancy) and the timing of the intercourse in relationship to your menstrual cycle.

Pregnancy is most likely to occur when intercourse occurs around the time of ovulation (the monthly release of an egg). The only way to know for sure when you ovulate is by charting your menstrual cycles. The best way to chart your cycles is by recording your basal body temperature, the characteristics of your cervical mucus, and the timing of your periods every day for several months. Right around the tiime of ovulation, you will notice a slight rise in your basal body temperature and your cervical mucus will become clear and elastic (like egg whites). To become pregnant, you would want to have intercourse just before, during, and just after your anticipated ovulation day. Most women ovulate mid-cycle. For a 28 day cycle, you would ovulate about two weeks after the first day of your period and two weeks before your next period.

If you are planning a pregnancy, please contact your regular medical provider for a pre-pregnancy check-up. Let him or her know that you would like to become pregnant and they will talk with you about possible lifestyle changes you might need to make to help ensure a healthy pregnancy.

If you do not wish to be pregnant, please don’t continue to have unprotected sex. Either abstain from sex or use birth control. If you are interested in starting a method of birth control and you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment.  We can talk with you about all of your contraceptive options and help you choose one that best fits your lifestyle. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: me and my husband had unprotected sex two nights in a row and he came inside me both times. i still have about a two weeks til i have my period and i always have a funny feeling in my stomach and am moody and have felt nausea. could i be pregnant?

It is doubtful that you would be having pregnancy symptoms so soon. However, each pregnancy is different and each woman may experience different symptoms or no symptoms at all. 

Early pregnancy symptoms include the following: implantation bleeding (many women do not experience this but when it occurs, it consists of spotting and cramping anywhere from 6 to 12 days after conception); delayed or missed period (if bleeding occurs, it is usually lighter than a regular period); swollen and tender breasts (1-2 weeks after conception); fatigue (as early as one week after conception); backaches; headaches; frequent urination (6-8 weeks after conception); and nausea or morning sickness.  Usually, pregnant women first experience nausea anywhere from 2-8 weeks after conception, while others never get nauseous. Certainly, pregnancy cannot be ruled out until you are tested.   Wait until your next period.  If you miss your period by a week or more, take a pregnancy test.  If negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

If you are planning a pregnancy, the following tips can help ensure a positive pregnancy outcome.

  • Schedule a pre-pregnancy appointment with your doctor.  Let your doctor know you are planning a pregnancy.  Your doctor will review your family health history, be sure you have the proper immunizations, review your medications, schedule any needed tests, and discuss your present health behaviors/lifestyle and recommend changes.
  • Begin taking a daily multivitamin with 400 mcg of folic acid ( a B vitamin that prevents birth defects of the brain and spine).
  • If you smoke, quit and avoid second-hand smoke.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages.
  • If you use street drugs, stop using them, and check with a doctor before using prescription or over-the-counter medications (some medications are not safe to use during pregnancy).
  • Eat healthfully and maintain a healthy weight.
  • Be sure to get regular preventive medical care.
  • Reduce the amount of stress in your life (if possible).
  • Get regular exercise.  Walking, swimming, stretching, and housework are all good exercise choices before and during pregnancy.

  Good luck!

Q: I have had spoting for a week then I had caught a yeast infection. After that I started to get bloated and have sore nipples for over two weeks now. Could this be a possible sign that I could be pregant?

Yes, those are possible pregnancy signs. However, the bloating and sore breasts may be pre-menstrual symptoms as well. If you miss your next period by a week or more, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

Q: My fiancé and I had unproteced sex 6days ago on the day I was suppose to start my period. My period still has not come, could I be pregnant?

Yes, anytime you have unprotected sex, pregnancy is possible. if you are a week or more late for your period, take a pregnancy test. Use first morning urine for the best results. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result. Good luck.

Q: my last depo shot was due march 17 didnt get it…period came the next day. had unprotected sex on ovulation day. period didnt come im now a week late three different pregnancy test neg. put pregnancy symptoms could i still be pregnant?

Yes, pregnancy is possible. However, after stopping the Depo shot, it can take up to six months for you to start ovulating and having regular periods again (for a few women, it can take up to two years). Therefore, it is more likely that you are skipping your period because of your recent Depo use. However, if you feel as though you are pregnant, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result. You can also contact your regular medical care provider and request a blood test for pregnancy.

Q: I am on a combined pill(lo loestrin fe) and last night, had unprotected sex. Usually i take my pill around 6:30 am, but forgot and took at 4:30 p.m .. I have not mssed any pills before..so what s the chance of me becoming pregnant? Should i use plan b?

When used perfectly, the pill is 99% effective. Taking a pill late just slightly increases your risk of pregnancy. We only recommend an emergency contraceptive (Plan B) when you are 24 hours or more late for your next pill. Just remember to take the rest of your pills on time.

Q: So I’ve been on the shot for about a month and a few days and last night my boyfriend and I had sex and he came inside me? Is there a chance that I could get pregnant and if so do I need to get an emergency contraceptive?

The shot is sufficient protection against pregnancy, and emergency contraception is not needed. The shot works by preventing ovulation (the monthly release of an egg) so it doesn’t matter if your partner ejaculates inside of the vagina. If there is no egg for the sperm to unite with, you cannot become pregnant. By itself, the shot is over 99% effective in preventing pregnancy. Unfortunately, no birth control method is 100% effective so there is still a slight risk of pregnancy, but Depo is one of the most effective methods.

Q: I had sex on march 9th later that day my period came on which last for 5 days. then two weeks later i had sex on march 24 @ 5am which one could be the fater the first one or the second one?

It is more likely that your second sexual partner is the biological father since you had a normal period after the first partner. The beginning of your pregnancy is always marked by the first day of your last menstrual period. However, during one or more of your prenatal visits, they will perform an ultrasound. The ultrasound will give you a much more accurate idea of when the pregnancy occurred.

Q: I’ve been on birth control for over a year and a half now. Ususally my periods last about 4 days and are moderately heavy. However my last “period” only lasted 2 days and was super super light. what’s up with that?

Every now and then, women may experience a lighter than usual period – even those who have been using a hormonal birth control method for an extended period of time. Common reasons for menstrual irregularities include stress, change in diet or exercise, a recent illness, or recent medication use. If your period continues to be lighter and you are concerned, contact the medical provider who prescribed your birth control method for an appointment.

Q: Ive been on birth control for a while now and this month my period just ended and i took the first pill for this month. About two hours later i had unprotected sex and he came in me. can i get pregnant?

As long as you didn’t miss any pills in the previous pack and as long as there was no gap between your pill packs (meaning you took your last sugar pill and then the next day at the same time you took your first active pill in the new pack), you are protected by the pill. When used perfectly, the pill is 99% effective.

You remain protected by the pill as long as you are taking a pill every single day (regardless of whether it is a hormone pill or a sugar pill). During the active pills in your pack (the first three weeks), hormones build up in your body to last you through the seven days of your sugar pills so you are even protected during your period week. Just don’t forget to start a new pack the very next day after you’ve finished your sugar pills.

Q: this is my first month on birth control, I am almost done with the third week. I have been taking them on time everyday, my guy and I always use condoms. We plan on taking a trip this week, would I be protected from pregnancy if we have sex with out a condom? We do not want children at the moment, what are my chances of getting pregnant while being on birth control? The day of the trip I will start the brown pills, whcih is the week im suppose to start my period.

As long as you have been taking your pills around the same time every day, it should be safe for you to have sex without a condom. When the pill is used perfectly, it is 99% effective. Unfortunately, no birth control method is 100% effective so there is still a slight risk of pregnancy. However, most women who are using the birth control pill have sex without using a condom.

Missing pills or taking them more than 3 hours late can increase your risk of pregnancy. Just be sure to take your pills on time and be sure to start a new pack of pills the day after you finish your sugar pills (the fourth week of pills when you get your period).

Q: I had a lot of discharge and the occasional itch around my vagina. I’ve had a yeast infection before and assumed it was just that. After my three-day monistat and period (which I got in the middle of the medication) I assumed it had gone away. My boyfriend and I were then fooling around and he went down on me. However, today it seems to me that I still may have a yeast infection. Would it have tasted really badly down there if it seems to be just a light yeast infection?

Probably not. Sometimes receiving oral sex can actually cause a yeast infection in women. Also, it’s possible that you still had the yeast infection when you had oral sex. We recommend a seven day treatment rather than a three day treatment. The infection is more likely to go away for good and less likely to recur.

Unfortunately, if you did have a yeast infection when the oral sex took place, it is possible that you may have transmitted the infection to your partner. A yeast infection in the mouth is known as oral candida or thrush. If your partner notices white patchy areas or lesions in the mouth or on the tongue or an irritated or itchy feeling in the mouth, he may want to visit a medical practitioner for diagnosis and treatment. If thrush is diagnosed, treatment typically includes an antifungal medication and salt water rinses.

If your itching and irritation does not go away after a seven day treatment, you should also be seen by a medical professional. It may not be yeast at all – in which case, you will need to be screened for other types of infections.

Q: i finished my period about a week now i had sexual intercourse yesterday today im bleeding is it possible that i could fall pregnant?

Yes, pregnancy is possible whenever you have unprotected sex. You may want to use the morning after pill to reduce your risk of pregnancy.

Plan B One-step is a pill you can take after unprotected sex to reduce the risk of pregnancy. It works best if it is used within the first 24 hours after sex but can be used up to 120 hours (or five days) after unprotected sex with decreased effects after the first three days.  The sooner you use Plan B, the more effective it is.

Plan B works by delaying ovulation (the monthly release of an egg), and possibly by interfering with fertilization (the union of sperm and egg) and implantation (when the fertilized egg implants itself into the uterine lining). If you are already pregnant, it will not terminate the pregnancy. According to the manufacturer, the treatment prevents seven of eight pregnancies that otherwise would have occurred.

If you are 17 or older, you can purchase Plan B at most drug stores without a prescription. You will need to ask the pharmacist for Plan B as it is located behind the counter. You may also need to show ID to prove your age. Plan B is around $50. If you are under 17, you will need a prescription from a doctor. You can also get Plan B from a Family Planning or Planned Parenthood clinic. We offer Plan B at all of our clinics at a reduced cost. Some individuals qualify for free services.

One of the most common side effects of Plan B use is menstrual irregularity.  Therefore, your next period could be earlier than usual, later than usual, or spotty (meaning you may bleed for a few days, stop, and then bleed some more). However, if you are a week or more late for your period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

Plan B should not be used as a regular method of birth control as it is less effective than other methods.  If you are going to continue to have sexual contact, you may want to think about using a regular form of birth control.  If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment to discuss your contraceptive options. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: I haven’t had my period this month, I am supposed to start it on the last week of this month. My boyfriend and I had unprotected sex this past saturday and he ejaculated inside of me. I know there is a chance of being pregnant, but I am just wondering if I could still get my period this month even if I am or will I miss this month’s period along with the rest of the 9 months..?

Most women do not experience vaginal bleeding while they are pregnant, but some women do. When bleeding is present during pregnancy, it is usually lighter than it normally is.  If you are a week or more late for your period or if your period is lighter than it normally is, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

If you do not wish to be pregnant, please don’t continue to have unprotected sex. Either abstain from sexual intercourse or use condoms for each sexual act. If you are interested in learning more about your contraceptive options, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

If you are planning a pregnancy, schedule an appointment with your doctor.  Let your doctor know you are planning a pregnancy.  Your doctor will review your family health history, be sure you have the proper immunizations, review your medications, schedule any needed tests, and discuss your present health behaviors/lifestyle and recommend changes.

Q: I was spotting for a week last month. I started my period yesterday but I was two days late. I’m bleeding normal as usual now. Should I be concerned?

I wouldn’t be too concerned. Mid-cycle spotting can occur for a number of different reasons, and most of the time, the cause is benign. However, if the spotting continues during your next menstrual cycle or if you start to develop other symptoms or menstrual irregularities, contact your regular medical provider for an appointment. If you don’t have a regular doctor, call a gynecologist or the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: My boyfriend and I were having sex and the condom broke so I went and got the plan B pill right away. I had a pretty heavy period about a week later (two weeks ahead of schedule). A few days ago, about a week before my regular period, we had a romantic night and got caught up in the moment without a condom. Now, a few days before my orginally scheduled period I am having ovary pain and spotting. Could this be the plan B or do I need to take a pregnancy test?

It could be either. It may just be the beginning of your period. If you don’t get your period and you are more than a week late for it, take a pregnancy test just in case. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result. 

Provided that you are not pregnant, you may want to think about using a regular form of birth control.  If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment to discuss your contraceptive options. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Until you can meet with a medical provider, be sure to use condoms from start to finish with every act of intercourse.  Condoms work best when they are used correctly and consistently. Here are some tips for correct condom use.

  • Always check the expiration date to be sure it is not expired prior to use.
  • Condoms should be stored at room temperature in a sharps free environment.
  • Never use an oil-based lubricant with a latex condom. If you need additional lubricant, use a water-based type like KY Jelly or Astroglide.
  • Pinch the tip of the condom between the thumb and forefinger while rolling it onto the erect penis to ensure that there is no air pocket in the tip of the condom.
  • Smooth out the sides of the condom once it has been rolled on to ensure there are no air pockets in the sides of the condom.
  • Hold onto the rim or base of the condom while removing the penis from the vagina to prevent it from slipping off inside the vagina during removal.
  • Do not have any penis-vagina contact without a condom.

Q: i had sex friday night/saturday mornning at 2 AM, when is the latest that I can take plan b?

Thursday morning at 2:00 a.m. – but remember that Plan B is most effective if it is used within the first 24 hours after the unprotected sex.

Q: I took plan b right after my period then 4 days later took next choice, 6 days after taking the next choice i spotted just enough to see on the toilet paper. I am now a week late for my period, my boyfiend and i may have had an accident a week after the second pill but i didnt take anything I have taken a pregnancy test 3 times in the past week but they were all negative. Is this a side effect or could i be pregnant and my HCG levels not high enough yet.

Since you took emergency contraceptive pills twice within a week, you are even more likely to experience menstrual irregularities.  However, pregnancy is also possible as the spotting you experienced may have been implantation bleeding. Repeat the pregnancy test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result. If you don’t have a period within the next four weeks and your test is still negative, contact a medical provider for an appointment. They may want to run a blood test for pregnancy.

In the meantime, either abstain from sex or use condoms from start to finish for every act of sexual intercourse. Just in case you are pregnant, eat healthfully and avoid tobacco, alcohol and street drugs. 

If it turns out that you are not pregnant, please remember that the morning after pill should not be used as a regular method of birth control as it is less effective than other methods.  If you are going to continue to have sexual contact, you may want to think about using a regular form of birth control.  If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment to discuss your contraceptive options. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you. Good luck!

Q: on the first day of ovulation…can I get pregnant if a condom gets stuck in me?

Yes, pregnancy is possible when the condom slips off inside of you. If the intercourse occurred around the time of ovulation, pregnancy is even more likely. If you are a week or more late for your period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

Condoms work best when they are used correctly and consistently. Here are some tips for correct condom use.

  • Always check the expiration date to be sure it is not expired prior to use.
  • Condoms should be stored at room temperature in a sharps free environment.
  • Never use an oil-based lubricant with a latex condom. If you need additional lubricant, use a water-based type like KY Jelly or Astroglide.
  • Pinch the tip of the condom between the thumb and forefinger while rolling it onto the erect penis to ensure that there is no air pocket in the tip of the condom.
  • Smooth out the sides of the condom once it has been rolled on to ensure there are no air pockets in the sides of the condom.
  • Hold onto the rim or base of the condom while removing the penis from the vagina to prevent it from slipping off inside the vagina during removal.
  • Do not have any penis-vagina contact without a condom.

You and your partner may want to consider a hormonal method of birth control since they are a little more effective. If you live near our service area, please contact one of our offices for an appointment. If you live further away, call the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: I had protected sex two weeks ago and i have a feeling i might be pregnant, how can i tell if i am pregnant or not?

The only way to know for sure is to take a pregnancy test. Urine pregnancy tests are not reliable until you are at least a week or more late for your period. Therefore, if you don’t get your next period, buy a home pregnancy test. Use first morning urine for the best results. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

Some early pregnancy symptoms include the following: implantation bleeding (many women do not experience this but when it occurs, it consists of spotting and cramping anywhere from 6 to 12 days after conception); delayed or missed period (if bleeding occurs, it is usually lighter than a regular period); swollen and tender breasts (1-2 weeks after conception); fatigue (as early as one week after conception); backaches; headaches; frequent urination (6-8 weeks after conception); and nausea or morning sickness.  Usually, pregnant women first experience nausea anywhere from 2-8 weeks after conception, while others never get nauseous.

Q: Hello…I have to give a little of my background before I get to my question. I have tried many different types of birth control. The depo made my hair start falling out. The pill gave me migraines. I had reoccuring vaginal infections with the I.U.D.. The patch burned my skin. See what I mean,lol? So I had unprotected sex in December of 2011. I took the morning after pill which messed my cycle up for a month. So in January I got two periods. One started on the 5th and the other started on the 27th of January. So February my cycle came on February 22, 2012. It was normal. March 22, 2012 I started my monthly cycle…it was normal as well. So I had unprotected sex on April 8, 2012. I was due to get my cycle around the 21st of April but I started spotting on the 14th and its starting to seem like a normal cycle. So…my question is should I concerned about being pregnant?

Anytime you have unprotected sex, pregnancy is possible. If the spotting you are experiencing now does not evolve into more heavier bleeding, take a pregnancy test at the end of April. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

In the meantime, do not continue to have unprotected sex if you don’t want to be pregnant. Though you have experienced problems with many methods, there are some other options that you haven’t explored (the vaginal ring and implanon are two that come to mind). Until you can meet with a medical professional to discuss your options, be sure to use condoms from start to finish for every act of intercourse.

Q: Even if i take the pill everyday and shower everytime i have sex, is pregnacy still likely?

If you are taking the birth control pill at the same time every day and you have been using the pill for longer than a week, pregnancy is highly unlikely. Showering after sex has no effect on whether or not you will become pregnant.

Q: i took a plan b pill earlier today, but me and my boyfriend had sex again today and the condom broke. is the plan b pill i took earlier still effective or should i take another dose? or shou

No, you don’t need to take another Plan B pill. The one you took earler today is sufficient.  However, don’t have any more unprotected sex. Because of your Plan B use, your next period could be earlier than usual, later than usual, or spotty (meaning you may bleed for a few days, stop, and then bleed some more). However, if you are a week or more late for your period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result. Just remember that Plan B should not be used as a regular method of birth control as it is less effective than other methods.

Condoms work best when they are used correctly and consistently. Here are some tips for correct condom use.

  • Always check the expiration date to be sure it is not expired prior to use.
  • Condoms should be stored at room temperature in a sharps free environment.
  • Never use an oil-based lubricant with a latex condom. If you need additional lubricant, use a water-based type like KY Jelly or Astroglide.
  • Pinch the tip of the condom between the thumb and forefinger while rolling it onto the erect penis to ensure that there is no air pocket in the tip of the condom.
  • Smooth out the sides of the condom once it has been rolled on to ensure there are no air pockets in the sides of the condom.
  • Hold onto the rim or base of the condom while removing the penis from the vagina to prevent it from slipping off inside the vagina during removal.
  • Do not have any penis-vagina contact without a condom.

You and your partner may want to consider a hormonal method of birth control since they are a little more effective. If you live near our service area, please contact one of our offices for an appointment. If you live further away, call the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: 2days after seeing my menses,I had an unprotected sex with my boyfriend then discovered a foamy brownish discharge,I used antibiotics drugs and cream on that same night of usage I discovered blood stains on my panties which has being on for the past 3days,wht should I do?no difficulty in urinating ,no itching,noo sweelling of cervix

Contact your regular medical provider for an appointment. You may have some type of vaginal infection despite the fact that you are not having any other symptoms. If you don’t have a regular doctor, contact a gynecologist or a Family Planning/Planned Parenthood office for an appointment.

Q: I’ve been on birth control since Februrary. I had my period the first month and then in March I had no period at all but experienced some discharge of old blood. Just this april I started to feel bloated and had cramps as if I was starting my period but there was very light bleeding. I’m just kind of confused, was I on my period or is it something else?

It would help to know what type of birth control you are using. However, any type of hormonal contraception will affect your periods. In most cases, periods are much lighter and shorter in duration. Also, it usually takes about three months for your body to adjust to the new hormone levels. During this adjustment period, you are very likely to experience some menstrual irregularities.  These irregularities may include missed periods, breakthrough bleeding (bleeding in between periods) or spotting. If you have been using your method correctly, pregnancy is unlikely. However, if you are concerned about the possibility of pregnancy, take a pregnancy test. Unless you test positive for pregnancy, continue to use your birth control method as directed.

Q: I have been on Birth controls for many years. Last month a missed several days and continued to take it. I hve been with my partner for 5 years now so we have no worries if he would cum in me or not. We recentaly decided tht we are ready to have a baby and so im not taking birth control this month. I had my period, very heavy but only lasted two days which is not typical for me, then had sex the day it was over. (again we are tryin for a baby now so he did cum in me) but now today im lightly spotting. Im very confused, because i have been pregnant before and misscarried at 3months. What is going on!?

It can take a few months for you to resume regular periods when you stop using a hormonal method of birth control. Most experts advise women on the birth control pill to wait at least three months after stopping the pill to attempt pregnancy.  During those three months, you could use condoms. Although the hormones are very quickly passed from your system, this time period will allow you to resume regular menstrual cycles so a pregnancy can be dated.  This also allows the uterine lining to thicken and provide a better site for the placenta to implant and grow.  

The following tips can help ensure that you have a healthy pregnancy:

  • Schedule a pre-pregnancy appointment with your doctor.  Let your doctor know you are planning a pregnancy.  Your doctor will review your family health history, be sure you have the proper immunizations, review your medications, schedule any needed tests, and discuss your present health behaviors/lifestyle and recommend changes.
  • Begin taking a daily multivitamin with 400 mcg of folic acid ( a B vitamin that prevents birth defects of the brain and spine).
  • If you smoke, quit smoking and avoid second-hand smoke.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages.
  • If you use street drugs, stop using them and check with a doctor before using prescription or over-the-counter medications (some medications are not safe to use during pregnancy).
  • Eat healthfully and maintain a healthy weight.
  • Be sure to get regular preventive medical care.
  • Reduce the amount of stress in your life (if possible).
  • Get regular exercise.  Walking, swimming, stretching, and housework are all good exercise choices before and during pregnancy.

Good luck!

Q: In the state of michigan can a doctor legally tell your parents that you told the doctor youve had sex

I am assuming that you are a minor (under the age of 18). Doctors in private practices can choose to inform parents about their children’s sexual behavior.  Some doctors choose to maintain confidentiality with their young patients and some choose to inform their parents. It is totally up to the medical provider. According to the Guttmacher Institute, only some minors are granted the right to consent (without a parent’s consent) to contraceptive (birth control) services in Michigan. These minors include those who have a health issue, or those who are married, pregnant, or deemed to be mature.

Q: I had sex with my boyfriend and we did it with a condom a lot of times. a few days later I’m bleedng brown blood and I’ve been feeling dizzy am I Pregnant? my period is suppose to come the 30 or 31st. help

If there was no penis-vagina contact without a condom and if the condom was always intact when he withdrew, pregnancy is highly unlikely.

Sometimes women will experience a bit of spotting around the time of ovulation. During ovulation, the level of estrogen rises which sometimes prompts the uterus to shed a bit of lining. This bit of lining shows up as spotting. This does not explain the dizziness you are experiencing though. If you continue to have dizziness or if you develop other symptoms, contact your regular medical provider for an appointment.

Some women do have implantation bleeding also which is one of the first signs of pregnancy. Though pregnancy is unlikely in your case, it is a possibility. Therefore, if you are a week or more late for your next period, take a pregnancy test just to be sure. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

Q: I am on the pill and had sex yesterday (no condom) today is my first sugar pill and I will take the full week of them. If I then do not start a new pack can I become pregnant? from the last time I had sex?

It is highly unlikely that you would become pregnant from yesterday’s sex if you took all of the hormone pills in your pack as directed (around the same time every day). If you do not wish to be pregnant, start your next pack at the regular time.

If you wish to attempt pregnancy, switch to condoms for three months before attempting pregnancy. Most experts advise women on the birth control pill to wait at least three months after stopping the pill to attempt pregnancy.  Although the hormones are very quickly passed from your system, this time period will allow you to resume regular menstrual cycles so a pregnancy can be dated.  This also allows the uterine lining to thicken and provide a better site for the placenta to implant and grow.  

The following tips will help to ensure that you have a healthy pregnancy. 

  • Schedule a pre-pregnancy appointment with your doctor.  Let your doctor know you are planning a pregnancy.  Your doctor will review your family health history, be sure you have the proper immunizations, review your medications, schedule any needed tests, and discuss your present health behaviors/lifestyle and recommend changes.
  • Begin taking a daily multivitamin with 400 mcg of folic acid ( a B vitamin that prevents birth defects of the brain and spine).
  • If you smoke, quit smoking and avoid second-hand smoke.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages.
  • If you use street drugs, stop using them, and check with a doctor before using prescription or over-the-counter medications (some medications are not safe to use during pregnancy).
  • Eat healthfully and maintain a healthy weight.
  • Be sure to get regular preventive medical care.
  • Reduce the amount of stress in your life (if possible).
  • Get regular exercise.  Walking, swimming, stretching, and housework are all good exercise choices before and during pregnancy.

Q: My ex is on the deprovera shot and we had unprotected sex once like 3 days between her next shot, this was a month ago, could she be pregnant?

If your ex was getting her shots on time (no more than 13 weeks apart), pregnancy is highly unlikely. Depo is over 99% effective. If the sex occurred 13 weeks or more after her shot but before her next shot, pregnancy is possible and she should take a pregnancy test.

Q: I switched birth control about a week and a half ago. I was previously on a birth control for three months. I never missed a day and always took the pills on time. I am worried that the switch of pills could potentially mean that I am pregnant. He pulled out to cum and there was no time in between the switching of pills. I had an appointment and that day I got my new pack and started it that night. HELP.

If there was no gap between the your former pills and your new pills, pregnancy is highly unlikely. Continue to take your pills around the same time every day. Since you are starting a new pill, it may take your body some time to adjust to the new hormone levels. You may experience some menstrual irregularities and/or other minor side effects for a few months. This is normal. If you skip a period, take a pregnancy test. But again, pregnancy is highly unlikely.

Q: My boyfriend ejaculated inside me and after I cleaned myself up and layed down it started burnin. What does this mean?

If the intercourse was forceful or rough, the burning sensation may just be a result of the intercourse. Yeast infections also can cause itching and burning in the vaginal and vulvar areas. If the burning sensation does not go away and/or if you develop additional symptoms of a vaginal infection (discharge, itching, redness, etc.), contact a medical provider for an infection check.

Q: had sex march 24th we used a condom nd he didn’t bust but it felt like it was slipping off, i started my period the next day.could i be pregnant it is April 18.

If your period was normal, it is extremely unlikely that you are pregnant. Continue to use condoms from start to finish with each act of intercourse to reduce your risk of pregnancy.

Condoms work best when they are used correctly and consistently. Here are some tips for correct condom use.

  • Always check the expiration date to be sure it is not expired prior to use.
  • Condoms should be stored at room temperature in a sharps free environment.
  • Never use an oil-based lubricant with a latex condom. If you need additional lubricant, use a water-based type like KY Jelly or Astroglide.
  • Pinch the tip of the condom between the thumb and forefinger while rolling it onto the erect penis to ensure that there is no air pocket in the tip of the condom.
  • Smooth out the sides of the condom once it has been rolled on to ensure there are no air pockets in the sides of the condom.
  • Hold onto the rim or base of the condom while removing the penis from the vagina to prevent it from slipping off inside the vagina during removal.
  • Do not have any penis-vagina contact without a condom.

You and your partner may want to consider a hormonal method of birth control since they are a little more effective. If you live near our service area, please contact one of our offices for an appointment. If you live further away, call the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: im 4 weeks pragnent and slept with another guy whos not pragnented me,is there any kind of sickness there?

If the person you slept with has a sexually transmitted infection and you were infected, it could be very harmful to the fetus. Many infections have no signs or symptoms so there is no way you can be sure that your recent partner had no diseases. Contact the medical provider who is taking care of your pregnancy and let him/her know that you may have been exposed to sexually transmitted infection. He or she will want to know the date of the intercourse so they can test you for any infections at the appropriate time/s. If you have not chosen a medical provider yet, please do so immediately and make your first appointment as soon as possible.

Q: if a guy cums on your belly and it turns watery and rols down in your …… can u be pragnent?????? im 16

Pregnancy is possible but unlikely in this case. However, you can reduce your risk of pregnancy by taking the morning after pill (as long as the incident occurred within the past 120 hours).

Plan B One-step is a pill you can take after unprotected sex to reduce the risk of pregnancy. It works best if it is used within the first 24 hours after sex but can be used up to 120 hours (or five days) after unprotected sex with decreased effects after the first three days.  The sooner you use Plan B, the more effective it is.

Plan B works by delaying ovulation (the monthly release of an egg), and possibly by interfering with fertilization (the union of sperm and egg) and implantation (when the fertilized egg implants itself into the uterine lining. If you are already pregnant, it will not terminate the pregnancy. According to the manufacturer, the treatment prevents seven of eight pregnancies that otherwise would have occurred. 

Since you are under 17, you will need a prescription from a doctor to get Plan B at a pharmacy. You may want to ask one of your parents to purchase it for you (the cost is around $50, but may be more in urban areas). You can also get Plan B from a Family Planning or Planned Parenthood clinic. We offer Plan B at all of our clinics. Our services and supplies are free for individuals under age 18.

One of the most common side effects of Plan B use is menstrual irregularity.  Therefore, your next period could be earlier than usual, later than usual, or spotty (meaning you may bleed for a few days, stop, and then bleed some more). However, if you are a week or more late for your period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

Also, if you and your partner were using withdrawal (without the benefit of a condom) to prevent pregnancy, there are some things you should know. 

Withdrawal or the pull out method is not a highly reliable method of birth control.  However, it is more effective when it is done correctly.   Of every 100 women whose partners use withdrawal, four will become pregnant each year if the method is done perfectly.  Of every 100 women whose partners use withdrawal, 27 will become pregnant if withdrawal is not always performed correctly.  

Couples who have great self-control, experience, and trust tend to use the pull out method more effectively. The male partner must be able to know exactly when ejaculation is coming and must be able to pull out before any semen is deposited in the vagina.  Generally, younger or less experienced men have a more difficult time predicting the time of ejaculation and have more difficulty pulling out in time. 

However, even if a man pulls out in time, pregnancy is still possible because of pre-seminal fluid (also called pre-ejaculate).  Pre-seminal fluid leaks out of the penis prior to ejaculation.  Sometimes this fluid contains sperm that is left in the urethra from a previous ejaculation.  If a man urinates between ejaculations before having sex again, it will help clear the urethra of sperm and may increase the effectiveness of withdrawal.  

You may want to think about starting a hormonal method of birth control if you plan to continue to have sex. When used correctly, hormonal methods of birth control are 99% effective. If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment. Your visit will be free and completely confidential. We can talk with you about all of your birth control options and help you choose one that best fits your lifestyle. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: I lost my virginity exactly two weeks ago. I am on the Depo shot for my birth control method which I have been on for over a month. We had sex without a condom that night. And now I’m still having light bleeding/brownish discharge (seen when I wipe). Is this normal?

Yes, that is normal. Menstrual irregularities (including missed periods, irregular bleeding, frequent light bleeding, and brown/pink spotting) are very common during the first six months of Depo use. Your bleeding may have nothing to do with the fact that you experienced your first intercourse. When you return to your medical provider for your second Depo shot, be sure to report the fact that you are now sexually active and that you experienced spotting for two weeks afterward. They may want to check you for any possible infections just to be on the safe side. In the meantime, if you experience any additional symptoms of vaginal infection (itching, irritation, burning, foul odor), contact your medical provider right away.

Q: I was diagnosed with trich 3 months ago and I took the medication and abstained from sex for a month but now I have been bleeding for two Weeks after my period could trich be the cause?

It is common for some women with trich to experience vaginal bleeding after intercourse due to cervical irritation. However, prolonged vaginal bleeding three months after a trich diagnosis is not typical. Please contact the medical professional who diagnosed your trich and explain your symptoms. They will probably want to see you to perform another evaluation and/or run some tests. Since they know your medical history, they can best advise you.

Q: Me nd my boyfriend just had unprotected sex and I came alot while having sex he ejaculated in me … What are the chances of me being pregnant?

Anytime you have unprotected sex, there is a risk of pregnancy. Having intercourse mid-cycle (approximately one week after your period or two weeks before your next one) increases the risk of pregnancy. Also, the more times you have unprotected sex, the greater your risk.

You can reduce your risk of pregnancy by taking the morning after pill. Plan B One-step is a pill you can take after unprotected sex to reduce the risk of pregnancy. It works best if it is used within the first 24 hours after sex but can be used up to 120 hours (or five days) after unprotected sex with decreased effects after the first three days.  The sooner you use Plan B, the more effective it is.

Plan B works by delaying ovulation (the monthly release of an egg), and possibly by interfering with fertilization (the union of sperm and egg) and implantation (when the fertilized egg implants itself into the uterine lining). If you are already pregnant, it will not terminate the pregnancy. According to the manufacturer, the treatment prevents seven of eight pregnancies that otherwise would have occurred.

If you are 17 or older, you can purchase Plan B at most drug stores without a prescription. You will need to ask the pharmacist for Plan B as it is located behind the counter. You may also need to show ID to prove your age. Plan B is around $50. If you are under 17, you will need a prescription from a doctor. You can also get Plan B from a Family Planning or Planned Parenthood clinic. We offer Plan B at all of our clinics at a reduced cost. Some individuals (including those under 18 years old) qualify for free services.

One of the most common side effects of Plan B use is menstrual irregularity.  Therefore, your next period could be earlier than usual, later than usual, or spotty (meaning you may bleed for a few days, stop, and then bleed some more). However, if you are a week or more late for your period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

Plan B should not be used as a regular method of birth control as it is less effective than other methods.  If you are going to continue to have sexual contact, you may want to think about using a regular form of birth control.  If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment to discuss your contraceptive options. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: Hi I am 17 years old, I had unprotected sex with my boyfriend and it was my first time. We had sex for about 30 seconds and I had to ask him to stop because it really hurt. 5 days after we had unprotected sex I have been experiencing soreness and itchiness in my vagina I am really worried about it and I dont know what to do. Could it be an STD or an infection. Please help me I am really scared.

You really should be seen by a medical provider for an infection check. If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment. Your visit will be free and confidential. We can also talk with you about your contraceptive options. If you live outside of our service area, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you for an appointment.

The vaginal irritation you are experiencing could be a sexually transmitted infection, but it might also be a simple yeast infection. The only way to know for sure is to be evaluated by medical professional.  If you decide to have sex again, please use a condom to reduce your risk of infection and pregnancy.

Q: i had unprotected sex 2, 3, and 4 days before my period. my period lasted only 4 days which is kinda shorter than usual and now i only feel nauseas sometimes 3 weeks later. could i be pregnant?

Yes, pregnancy is possible. If you are a week or more late for your next period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

In the meantime, if you do not wish to be pregnant, do not continue to have unprotected sex. Either abstain from sexual intercourse or use condoms from start to finish for each act of intercourse. If you are interested in starting a hormonal method of birth control and you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment. We can talk with you about all of your contraceptive options and help you choose one that best fits your lifestyle. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: Lately after me and my husband have unprotected sex, his penis has been breaking out with bumps all over it and it itches for him too. I dont itch, i dont have bumps down there. i am pregnant and idk if that could cause something to make his penis react to my vagina?

Your husband should see a medical provider as soon as possible to determine the cause of his outbreak. This is particularly important since you are pregnant. If he has an infection, he may be able to transmit it you during sexual intercourse which could cause complications for your pregnancy. However, it could be something as simple as a reaction to a yeast infection that you might have. In any event, it is best that he be seen by a medical provider just to be on the safe side.

Q: Should I be worried if the seventh day of my period is heavier than the first six, when usually thats when its fading off?

Periods can vary from month to month. However, if your bleeding becomes even heavier or continues for more than a few more days, contact your medical provider for an appointment.

Q: I’ve been on birth control and taken it correctly for about 5 months now. Last Thursday I was about 6 hours late taking my pill but I still took it on the same day. Around three hours after I took it I got sick and threw up. The following Sunday I had sex and my boyfriend ejaculated in me when we normally just pull out. Should I purchase plan b or should I be ok?

Plan B is not necessary in your case, and would only cause unnecessary side effects. If you had missed your pill by more than 24 hours or if you had thrown up within an hour after taking your pill, Plan B may have been indicated. Keep taking your pills as directed.

Q: i was taking a mexican shot for birth control but it was getting a bet costy so i went to the health deparment and got the depo a few days ago, but i have only two weeks i got the mexican one.(I have to put the mexican shot every 30 days) can my depo shot afect the bith control???

Unfortunately, we are unfamiliar with the mexican shot. If this is a monthly injection, it sounds like the equivalent of Lunelle here in the United States. Both Depo and Lunelle are progestin only methods and are highly effective (over 99% effective).  While it is not a good idea to receive both shots simultaneously as it overloads your system with hormones, it will not affect your regular birth control’s ability to prevent pregnancy.  However, it may increase the likelihood that you may experience some side effects. Please contact a medical care provider immediately if you have any of the following warning signs:

  • severe pain in the stomach or abdomen
  • unusually heavy or prolonged vaginal bleeding
  • a new lump in your breast
  • severe depression
  • migraine headaches accompanied by an aura
  • yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes

Even if you don’t have any of the above signs, please contact the health department where you received your Depo shot or the medical provider who provides your “mexican” shots, and explain what happened.  They may want to monitor your side effects more closely.

Q: if i had unprotected sex 4 days ago what can i do not to become pregnant?

Plan B is an emergency contraceptive pill that helps prevent pregnancy. It is most effective when taken within 24 to 72 hours after unprotected intercourse (about 75% to 80% effective).  Some research states that Plan B can still be somewhat effective when taken as long as 72 hours (5 days) after unprotected sex.

If it has been longer than 5 days after your unprotected intercourse, unfortunately, there is nothing you can do to prevent pregnancy. You will have to wait until your next period. Until then, use condoms or abstain from sex. If your period is more that 1 week late, do a pregnancy test.

You may want to consider beginning a long term method of birth control like birth control pills, patch, vaginal ring or the DepoProvera injection.

Family Planning Plus clinics offer gynecological exams, birth control, pregnancy testing and emergency contraception for little to no cost, depending on your household size and income. STD screenings are free for men and women of all ages. Please feel free to schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations.

 

Q: i started my period the on time usually lasts 3 to4 days and then start my new pack o birth control that week on friday ,so i started my white active pills but i have been spotting since 4 days into my pills

Sometimes spotting or bleeding from your period will last even after you begin a new pack of pills. Continue taking your pills every day. This should straighten out within the next week or two.

Q: Hi. I have been on Kariva bcp sine November, so about 5 months. My boyfriend and i had unprotected sex and I experienced a very, very light pink discharge went I used the restroom about an hour later. This is the first time is has happened. Any ideas on what it could be?

First, as long as you are taking your birth control pills correctly & consistently, you do not need to worry about pregnancy. Even if you and your partner do not use a condom, your pills are covering you as far as birth control.

It is not uncommon for women to sometimes have pink discharge or spotting after intercourse. If this occurs infrequently, it is not a concern. However, if it begins occurring more frequently, like every time after sex, or becomes heavier (like bleeding), it may be a signal that you have a vaginal infection. In this case, it would be a good idea to follow up with your doctor for a vaginal infection check and/or STD screening.

Family Planning Plus clinics offer gynecological exams, birth control, pregnancy testing and emergency contraception for little to no cost, depending on your household size and income. STD screenings are free for men and women of all ages. Please feel free to schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations.

 

Q: if a man ejactulates sperm into a female two days after she discontinues birth control

Yes, there is the risk of pregnancy anytime you have unprotected intercourse. If your partner discontinued her pill 2 days prior to sex, she was no long protected from pregnancy.

Q: my wife has been working a lot in the past 2 years , it is only in the last few months that i realized that she no longer has the same white discharge that normally she secreats during sex, also it smells clean as if she just washed her vagina , before even after a shower she would smell like a “normal” vagina (like freshly sharppened pencil) .also she would orgasm every time ,but not lately, she blames it as being tired. she lost some of her work and now i can see the normal white discharge and she orgasm again, i’m thinking that she is cheating on me am i correct?

Nothing you described would indicate that your wife is having an affair. Clear to white vaginal discharge without a strong odor  is normal throughout the menstrual cycle, and stress and fatigue can affect one’s ability to reach orgasm. Also, vaginal discharge may change periodically throughout a woman’s life. If you are worried about the possibility that your wife is cheating on you, you need to talk to her.  When you bring up the topic, don’t accuse her of cheating – she may not be cheating at all. Just explain what you have noticed lately and tell her that you are worried that she may be seeing someone else, and see what she says.

Q: My boyfriend and I had protected sex, and the morning after i took the plan b pill.Later that night we had sex again. first with a condom, then tried it without. He didn’t cum inside me, but could i still be pregnant from any semen left around my vagina or his penis? Also could the plan b pill taken that morning prevent me from being pregnant from the sex that night?

Anytime you have unprotected intercourse, there is the risk of pregnancy.

Plan B helps prevent pregnancy by delaying ovulation. When taken within 24 hours after unprotected sex, it is about 75% to 80% effective. The Plan B that you took in the morning would probably still be effective for the unprotected intercourse that you had that night. However, having repeated incidents of unprotected sex after Plan B could actually increase your risk of pregnancy, depending on where you’re at in your cycle. So be sure to use condoms until you have your next period.

If your next period is more than 1 week late, do a pregnancy test.

Q: im on the pill and shot and i stopped taking the pill and i let my boyfriend cum in me can i get pregnant

It is unusual for a woman to be on the birth control pills and the Depo injection at the same time. However, if you were taking the birth control pills for a month or two to help decrease bleeding, then the Depo would still be considered your primary birth control method. (Irregular bleeding and spotting can sometimes be a common side effect of the Depo injection.)

If you are current with your injections, you are still protected from pregnancy, even if you discontinued the pills.

Q: i had sex once last month my husband came inside. this month im 14 days lated but took 3 test they are negitive can i be pregrnant?

Anytime you have unprotected intercourse, there is the chance of pregnancy. However, it you have done 3 pregnancy tests at different times during the past 2 weeks, you most likely are not pregnant.

Many things can disrupt your menstrual cycle, making it come early, late, or sometimes, not at all. Things likes stress, illness, or changes in diet, exercise or sleep patterns can all affect your cycle.

At this point, wait until next month. If you still do not have a period, you may want to follow up with your doctor to have this checked out.

Q: I had an incident with my boyfriend. We were drinkin and had Sex and the condom split. A few hours after this I ran to the drug store and took plan B. We had had sex a few times that evening and we were under the influence of alcohol. Long story short, one of the times we had sex the condom slipped off and being in an intoxicated state he didnt notice and neither did I. I took Plan be Sunday and the incident happened on Sunday. But today…tuesday…i found the lost condom inside me. Will Plan B still be effective and have done the job?

Plan B is not 100% effective, but it does reduce the risk of pregnancy. Plan B One-step is a pill you can take after unprotected sex to reduce the risk of pregnancy. It works best if it is used within the first 24 hours after sex but can be used up to 120 hours (or five days) after unprotected sex with decreased effects after the first three days.  The sooner you use Plan B, the more effective it is. Your timely use of the medication increases the likelihood that Plan B will work for you. However, its effectiveness also depends on the timing of your menstrual cycle. If you ovulated just before taking Plan B, it is less likely to work for you.

Plan B works by delaying ovulation (the monthly release of an egg), and possibly by interfering with fertilization (the union of sperm and egg) and implantation (when the fertilized egg implants itself into the uterine lining). If you are already pregnant, it will not terminate the pregnancy. According to the manufacturer, the treatment prevents seven of eight pregnancies that otherwise would have occurred.

As I’m sure you know, use of alcohol interferes with one’s ability to use condoms effectively. Condoms work best when they are used correctly and consistently. Here are some tips for correct condom use.

  • Always check the expiration date to be sure it is not expired prior to use.
  • Condoms should be stored at room temperature in a sharps free environment.
  • Never use an oil-based lubricant with a latex condom. If you need additional lubricant, use a water-based type like KY Jelly or Astroglide.
  • Pinch the tip of the condom between the thumb and forefinger while rolling it onto the erect penis to ensure that there is no air pocket in the tip of the condom.
  • Smooth out the sides of the condom once it has been rolled on to ensure there are no air pockets in the sides of the condom.
  • Hold onto the rim or base of the condom while removing the penis from the vagina to prevent it from slipping off inside the vagina during removal.
  • Do not have any penis-vagina contact without a condom.

One of the most common side effects of Plan B use is menstrual irregularity.  Therefore, your next period could be earlier than usual, later than usual, or spotty (meaning you may bleed for a few days, stop, and then bleed some more). However, if you are a week or more late for your period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

Plan B should not be used as a regular method of birth control as it is less effective than other methods.  If you are going to continue to have sexual contact, you may want to think about using a hormonal method of birth control as they are more effective.  If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment to discuss your contraceptive options. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: i just ended my period yesterday and last night i had unprotected sex with my husband he ejaculated inside me 3 to 4 times, then today i started spotting i know its early but could i be pregnant?

Intercourse that occurs just before, during or just after the menstrual period is unlikely to result in pregnancy. The spotting you experienced is most likely the tail end of your period. If you are attempting pregnancy and have regular 28 day cycles, you are most likely to become pregnant around day 14 (with day 1 being the first day of your period). If you are interested in learning how to chart your menstrual periods to determine your most fertile days, contact your regular medical care provider or look in the yellow pages for a provider who offers instruction in natural family planning. Good luck!

Q: I have been on my period for a few days now, and today I thought my period was ended because I went for a few hours without bleeding. My boyfriend and I had sex tonight, and afterwards both of our privates were covered in blood (this was my third time having intercourse with anyone) Later on in the night the bleeding became excessive- as in worse than a period would be and I had clots. I’ve never had this issue before, is it something to be concerned about?

Many women experience breaks in bleeding and blood clots during their periods. During your period, your body releases anticoagulants that keep the blood from clotting. However, when the flow is strong and blood is being expelled rapidly, the blood may pass before the anticoagulants can work. In this case, the blood may clot as it is passed.

Keep in mind that the thickness of the uterus lining is different from one month to the next so your period may be heavier in some months which may make it more likely for clots to develop.

Unless the bleeding worsens or continues for longer than a normal period, I wouldn’t worry about it. However, if you experience pain that is worse than normal cramping with your bleeding or your bleeding intensifies and does not stop after a few more days, contact your regular medical care provider.

Q: I’m two weeks late on my period. Although, I’ve not had much of a regular period in the past, I feel two weeks is too long of a time for something not to be up. I’ve taken two pregnancy tests. The first was the first week after my missed period and the second was the second week after my missed period. Both tests were negative. However, I did have unprotected sex about a month ago. Also, I have a few symptoms that I would barely associate with pregnancy. I have been craving food more and I have gotten nauseous after eating a few times. I feel mildly bloated, but I’m not sure if that’s just my period waiting to happen. I was wondering if there was anything else that could delay my period.

 Menstrual irregularities (including missed or late periods) can occur for a number of different reasons. Pregnancy is just one possibility.  Irregular periods can be caused by hormonal imbalances, perimenopause, illness or infection, use of certain medications, and other more serious conditions.  Women who are dieting or exercising excessively may also skip periods. In addition, increased stress levels and changes in routine may affect the regularity of menstrual cycles.  

Since you are experiencing nausea, I would repeat the pregnancy test in two weeks. Be sure to use first morning urine and do not drink anything prior to your test. If it is still negative and you miss a second period, you should probably be evaluated by a medical professional to determine the cause.

In the meantime, watch out for the following early pregnancy symptoms, keeping in mind that each pregnancy is different and each woman may experience different symptoms or no symptoms at all.  Early pregnancy symptoms include the following: implantation bleeding (many women do not experience this but when it occurs, it consists of spotting and cramping anywhere from 6 to 12 days after conception); delayed or missed period (if bleeding occurs, it is usually lighter than a regular period); swollen and tender breasts (1-2 weeks after conception); fatigue (as early as one week after conception); backaches; headaches; frequent urination (6-8 weeks after conception); and nausea or morning sickness.  Usually, pregnant women first experience nausea anywhere from 2-8 weeks after conception, while others never get nauseous.

Good luck!

Q: my ovulation day was march 27 and I had sex the 25,26,27 can I be pregnant?

Yes, you could be pregnant. If you truly ovulated on the 27th, you had intercourse during your most fertile days. If you are one week or more late for your next period, take a pregnancy test.

Q: This month I lost my virginity, we used a condom and we checked it, it had no leaks and was not broken. I came on my period bang on time and was fairly regular (wet with blood) then for another two days was very light and it was brown. Help?

I’m assuming that your period was a little different than it normally is. However, the period you described is quite normal for many women.  The brown discharge you noted at the end of your period was most likely older blood that had not been expelled in a timely fashion. Most women will experience an irregular period at some point in their lives.

The menstrual cycle and periods can be affected by many things including stress, diet, illnesses, medications, exercise, and even a change in routine. Moving into a new situation (like beginning a sexual relationship) may have caused the change in your period.

If you are worried about a potential pregnancy, take a pregnancy test. However, since you used a condom, your risk is very low. If you are going to continue to have sex, be sure to use a condom every time. If you are interested in starting a hormonal method of birth control and you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment. We can talk with you about all of your contraceptive options and help you choose one that’s best for you. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: So i had sex more than once in the beginning of a new pack of my birth control , and now a couple days later I am having brown discharge what does this mean ? Should i stop taking my pills ?

No, do not stop taking your pills. As long as this was not your very first pack of pills (meaning you used the pill last month and there was no gap in time between your two packs) and as long as you have been taking your pill around the same time every single day, the pill should have protected you from becoming pregnant. However, if this was your very first pack of pills and the sex occurred during the first week of your pills, pregnancy is possible. Also missing pills or taking them late can sometimes cause spotting and increase the risk of pregnancy. If you don’t have any bleeding during the placebo pills, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test in two weeks just to be sure. Again, do not stop taking the pill unless you test positive for pregnancy.

If you continue to have irregular bleeding or spotting and you are taking your pills correctly, contact the provider who prescribed your pill.

Q: This is my second month using the nuvaring & im worried about a yellowish, greenish discharge im getting & vaginal irritation. I am taking antibiodics for a skin infection I got & a week ago I had unprotected sex. Could I have an STD? Or does antibiodics affect anything?

You probably have some type of vaginal infection and should be evaulated by a medical practitioner. It could be a sexually transmitted infection, but it might also be bacterial vaginosis or BV. BV is the name of a condition in women where the normal balance of bacteria in the vagina is disrupted and replaced by an overgrowth of certain bacteria.  It is sometimes accompanied by discharge, odor, pain, itching, or burning. Vaginal ring use does increase the risk of vaginal infections in some women. Antibiotic use can also cause vaginal infections. To find out the cause, see a doctor.

Q: Is it normal to miss your period on the second month when being on the birth control shot?

Yes. Some women never have a period while they are on the shot. It is also normal for some women to have irregular bleeding, spotting, or more frequent episodes of bleeding during the first six months of the shot.

Q: i been having unprotected sex and my boyfriend been cuming in me and my period came early this time what does that mean

As long as your period was normal and you didn’t have any unusual symptoms, it’s probably nothing to worry about. Most women will experience an early period at some point in their lives. However, if you are also experiencing pelvic discomfort, pain during intercourse or other reproductive symptoms, you should be evaluated by a gynecologist to determine if there is a medical condition causing changes in your menstrual cycle.

Early periods can be caused by stress and fatigue but they can also be caused by infections and more serious conditions of the reproductive tract. If you continue to experience menstrual irregularities (even if you don’t have any other problems), consult a medical practitioner.

If you do not wish to be pregnant, please don’t continue to have unprotected sex. Either abstain from sexual intercourse or use a method of birth control. If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment. We can talk with you about all of your contraceptive options and help you choose a method that’s best for you. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

If you are attempting pregnancy, schedule an appointment with your doctor for a complete physical.  Let your doctor know you are planning a pregnancy.  Your doctor will review your family health history, be sure you have the proper immunizations, review your medications, schedule any needed tests, and discuss your present health behaviors/lifestyle and recommend any needed changes.

Q: I missed my shot on March 12 and me and my boyfriend have been having unprotected sex. We had sex this morning and I took a test it came back positive can I really be pregnant?

Yes, pregnancy is possible since you have been having unprotected sex for almost a month. First, contact a medical professional to confirm the pregnancy. Though false positives are rare, it is possible that you are not pregnant. If your pregnancy is confirmed, however, you will need to make some big decisions. Discuss your options with your partner. It may also help to talk things over with family members or a trusted friend.

If you decide to continue the pregnancy, take the following steps until you can see an obstetrician.

  • Schedule your first pre-natal visit as soon as possible.
  • Begin taking a daily multivitamin with 400 mcg of folic acid (a B vitamin that prevents birth defects of the brain and spine).
  • If you smoke, quit immediately and avoid second-hand smoke.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages.
  • Do not use street drugs, and check with a doctor before using prescription or over-the-counter medications (some medications are not safe to use during pregnancy).
  • Eat healthfully and maintain a healthy weight.
  • Reduce the amount of stress in your life (if possible).
  • Get regular exercise.  Walking, swimming, stretching, and housework are all good exercise choices before and during pregnancy.

If you decide to terminate the pregnancy, contact the abortion clinic closest to you. Depending on your age and the state in which you live, there may be some restrictions on abortion access, so don’t delay.

Q: At the end of my last period, my boyfriend and I had unprotected sex. He “pulled-out” but I was still worried so I took PlanB. A few days later we had sex again, at first without a condom but finished with one. I wasn’t worried. Today me and my boyfriend had protected sex, but after finishing we looked down and the condom was gone. It had gotten stuck rather deep inside me, and he has cum inside it already. I am not on birthcontrol, and I should be getting my period in about 10-12days. How possible is it that I am pregnant? Is it smart to take PlanB again? Or is that dangerous to my health?

Use Plan B again. Though it is not meant to be used as a regular method of birth control, it is perfectly safe to use and will reduce your risk of pregnancy.

Condoms are very effective when they are used correctly and consistently. You and your boyfriend should follow these tips:

  • Always check the expiration date to be sure it is not expired prior to use.
  • Condoms should be stored at room temperature in a sharps free environment.
  • Never use an oil-based lubricant with a latex condom. If you need additional lubricant, use a water-based type like KY Jelly or Astroglide.
  • Pinch the tip of the condom between the thumb and forefinger while rolling it onto the erect penis to ensure that there is no air pocket in the tip of the condom.
  • Smooth out the sides of the condom once it has been rolled on to ensure there are no air pockets in the sides of the condom.
  • Hold onto the rim or base of the condom while removing the penis from the vagina to prevent it from slipping off inside the vagina during removal. Do this before or immediately after ejaculation to prevent leakage.
  • Do not have any penis-vagina contact without a condom.

You and your partner may want to consider a hormonal method of birth control since they are a little more effective. If you live near our service area, please contact one of our offices for an appointment. If you live further away, call the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: i’ve been on the pill for almost 5 years now. i’ve never had any problems or abnormalities regarding my body or my periods. i take the pill regularly and usually on a scheduled time every night. how high are my chances of pregnancy after such prolonged use? will i have problems having children when i’m ready?

The effectiveness of the pill is not affected by longevity of use, nor does use of the pill affect your ability to become pregnant when you are ready to start a family. As long as you are using the pill correctly (which it sounds like you are), your risk of pregnancy is about 1%. There is an 8% risk of pregnancy with typical pill use (forgetting to take pills every now and then, taking them late, or using certain medications with the pill that lowers its effectiveness).

Your fertility should return as soon as you stop the pill (meaning you could possibly become pregnant the month after stopping). However, most experts advise women on the birth control pill to wait at least three months after stopping the pill to attempt pregnancy.  Although the hormones are very quickly passed from your system, this time period will allow you to resume regular menstrual cycles so a pregnancy can be dated.  This also allows the uterine lining to thicken and provide a better site for the placenta to implant and grow.

Q: what does it mean when you get your regular period then later the same month you bleed again but only lasts 4 days, then the next month your period comes 4 weeks late and only lasts 4 1/2 days??

In short, it means that you are experiencing irregular menstrual cycles. Menstrual irregularities can occur for a number of different reasons. Irregular periods are generally caused by hormonal imbalances. These imbalances can occur because of hormonal birth control use, pregnancy, perimenopause, illness or infection, use of certain medications, and other more serious conditions.  Women who are dieting or exercising excessively may skip periods. In addition, increased stress levels and changes in routine may affect the regularity of menstrual cycles. It would be best to be evaluated by a medical professional if your irregularity continues.

Q: I had unprotected 7 days ago and idk when i should take a pregnancy test. I’ve been really hungry. I’ve been having light cramps, a little headaches from here and there but i have these symptoms before i even thought to be pregnant. Im stressing over this a lot because im only 16 and i’ll be 17 in july. Idk what to do. I need to know if i am or not so i can get on with my life.

Home pregnancy tests look for hCG (a pregnancy hormone) in the urine. Unfortunately, hCG does not usually reach a detectable level in most women until they are at least one week late for their periods. So, if you are one week or more late for your next period, you can take a test.

Tests are most reliable when you: 1) use your first morning urine,  2) don’t drink excessive amounts of fluids before the test (this can dilute hCG levels), 3) read the directions thoroughly before starting the test and follow every step precisely, and 4) are not using other medications that may interfere with the test results. If your result is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you either have a normal period or a positive result.

In the meantime, do not continue to have unprotected sex. Either abstain from sexual intercourse or use a method of birth control. If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment. We can talk with you about all of your contraceptive options and help you choose one that is best for you. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: Okay I’m on the nuvaring.. This is my second month on it. During the second month, when the 3 weeks were up, I took the nuvaring out for 1 week but I didn’t have a period. When I put the new one in after the week was up, I had a period for 1 week. 2 days after I stopped bleeding I had sex. The person a had sex with ejaculated in me, and yes the nuvaring was still in. I immediately rushed to the bathroom after to find that I had what looked like a brown discharge, and shortly after I started bleeding. I have been bleeding for two days now.. What do I do..?

During the first few months of hormonal contraceptive use, irregular bleeding or spotting is perfectly normal as your body adjusts to the new level of hormones. Sometimes intercourse can trigger bleeding episodes. If the irregular bleeding continues after you have been using the ring for at least three months, contact the provider who prescribed the ring for you, They may want to perform an infection check and/or talk with you about other contraceptive options.

Q: I just started my birth control two days ago and I had sex. I don’t believe the condom broke because we put water inside it and seen no leaks. Is there a chance I’m pregnant? Should I get the plan B pill?

Hopefully, you put the water in the condom after it was used. Filling a condom with water before use can weaken the condom. As long as you filled the condom with water after use, as long as there was no penis-vagina contact without a condom, and as long as the condom was intact and in place when he withdrew, there is no need for Plan B. Continue to use condoms until you have taken at least one full week of birth control pills (provided that is the method you are using). If there is a possibility that your partner might have a sexually transmitted infection, continue to use condoms while on the pill. The pill does not protect you against STIs.

Q: hello! Jan was the last month i had my period. i took a billion preganancy test and all were negative until i got a faint postive. i called a OB and they told me to wait a week and take another. i did that and i got a negative. so i just decied to wait it out and see what happens. i went to the bathroom the other mornin and felt something fall out of my vagina. i looked and saw a thick clear mucus like discharge. i didnt think anything of it because i thought that thats what your body is suppose to do from time to time. on the 29th of March i started spotting and it was really light pink. The next day i started cramping and bleeding so i just thought my period was finally coming.(started bleeding on the 31st of March) so i went to work and started cramping so bad that i couldnt function. i ended up having to go to the ER. they gave me a pelvic exam and tested my fluids. he told i had “trichonomas”. i Never had a STD before and NEVER thought i would. i am currently still being treated for it. and i stopped bleeding today (april 3rd) now my question is could there a possiblity that i am pregnant or did “trichonomas” stop me period?? the only syptoms i had were headaches and my viens bulging out of my breast and i can see blue veins in the palm of my hands and on the back of my hands. actually i can just see my veins all over and i never have before. PLEASE HELP!!

Although missed periods are not a typical symptom of trichomoniasis, any type of infection can affect menstrual cycles. Since you had a bout of heavy bleeding, pregnancy is very unlikely at this point. Follow up with your general practitioner and describe the symptoms you are experiencing. (regarding your veins). They may want to perform some tests.

In the meantime, do not have sexual intercourse until one week after you have finished all of  your medication for the trich. Your sexual partner/s should be treated as well so the infection does not spread any further. When you do resume sexual intercourse, be sure to use condoms to protect yourself from further infections.

Q: I had unprotected sex and two days after I started to bleed brownish blood and it lasted for about four days then stopped. I had just had my period a week and a half before the sex. I am on birth control and I have been for three years. What does this mean?

Dark colored or brownish blood or discharge is an indication of “old” blood. You are probably just having some left over discharge from your previous period. As long as you are not experiencing any signs of discharge like burning, foul odor, etc, just keep taking your pills on schedule. Your body will clean itself out and return to normal.

Q: i am 19 saturday night on march 30 i had sex first time and condom broke during anal session then replaced with a new one after that i asked her if she was clean and she said yes because she was recedently out of jail and most jails do std/hiv testing so should i get tested and did i do the right thing of replacing new condom?

Yes, you did the right thing by replacing the torn condom.

Continue using condoms for every act of sexual activity. Anytime you have unprotected intercourse, there is a risk of pregnancy and infection.

In the ideal world, you would have the “are you clean?” discussion prior to sexual activity. It can be difficult to have a discussion about past sexual history, especially if it’s a new partner. 

Many sexually transmitted infections do not exhibit symptoms. Therefore, a partner may have an infection and not be aware of it. If you are concerned about STD’s, consider having an STD screening done.   

Family Planning Plus clinics offer free STD screenings for men and women of all ages. Please feel free to schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations.

Q: can birth control pills terminate early weeks of pregnancy

No. If you are pregnant and wish to terminate your pregnancy, you should contact an abortion provider for more information about both medical and surgical abortions. Consult the yellow pages of your phone book or search online for the abortion provider closest to you.

Q: I just started my birth control eight days ago and my period just ended yesterday. I had protected sex today but we discovered to condom had broken during the act. If i take the plan b pill how will this effect my birth control and/or my cycle?

If you are on the pill and have not missed any pills or taken them late, Plan B is not needed. The pill becomes effective after you’ve taken a full week’s worth of pills. If you are on a different method or have missed pills, contact the provider who prescribed your method for their recommendation.

Condoms should be used in addition to the pill for protection against sexually transmitted infections (they are not necessary for pregnancy prevention). Condoms work best when they are used correctly and consistently. Here are some tips for correct condom use.

  • Always check the expiration date to be sure it is not expired prior to use.
  • Condoms should be stored at room temperature in a sharps free environment.
  • Never use an oil-based lubricant with a latex condom. If you need additional lubricant, use a water-based type like KY Jelly or Astroglide.
  • Pinch the tip of the condom between the thumb and forefinger while rolling it onto the erect penis to ensure that there is no air pocket in the tip of the condom.
  • Smooth out the sides of the condom once it has been rolled on to ensure there are no air pockets in the sides of the condom.
  • Hold onto the rim or base of the condom while removing the penis from the vagina to prevent it from slipping off inside the vagina during removal.
  • Do not have any penis-vagina contact without a condom.

Q: me and my boyfriend have unprotected sex and he doesn’t cum inside of me, but it got all over his penis and he put it back in me. i’m on birth control, but what are the chances of me being pregnant from this?

As long as you are using your birth control method correctly, the risk of pregnancy is extremely low. If you are using the pill, the ring, the patch, or the shot, and you are using your method exactly as directed, your risk of pregnancy is 1% or less (even if your partner ejaculates inside of you every time).

Q: hi! im 20 years old… and I neeed heeeelp! i had sex the day after my ovulating day, but after that day i took a next choice contraceptive pill… i am 7 days late on my period… and i was worried so I took 2 home pregnancy tests, the first one the result appeared like after 5 to 7 minutes and the result was weird because one of the lines was really fainted… (the result window) not like the control window that was very blue!…. it happened the same thing with the second test but that result appeared like the next morning…. Im worried i migh be pregnant… any HELP? :/

If you had a faint result, you may be pregnant and should contact a medical provider to confirm the pregnancy. If the provider confirms that you are pregnant, you will have some important decisions to make. Family Planning and Planned Parenthood offices provide options counseling for women experiencing unintended pregnancies, and can provide you with information about all of your options in a non-judgmental manner. If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

You may also find it helpful to discuss your situation with your partner, your family, and/or a trusted friend. Good luck!

Q: hey im 18. my boyfriend and i had sex about 2 weeks ago. we use a condom that never broke but after we had sex, i had a light almost pinkish brown discharge. this was not my first time so i had no reason to bleed. my period was due yesterday and it hasnt come yet. i know the chances a slim but could i be pregnant and how soon can i do a home pregnancy test? plz help

While it is possible that you could be pregnant, your risk is low. Wait until you are at least a week late for your period to perform a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

In the meantime, either abstain from sexual intercourse or use condoms. You may want to consider starting a hormonal method of birth control like the pill or the shot. When used correctly, these methods are 99% effective in preventing pregnancy. If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment. We can talk with you about all of your contraceptive options and help you choose one that is best for you. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Useful Info

HOLIDAY

Family Planning will be closed on the following holidays

New Years Day

Martin Luther King Day

President’s Day

Easter Monday

Memorial Day

July 4th

Labor Day

Thanksgiving & the following Monday

Christmas Day & the business day afterwards.

Locations

Lewisburg

4612 Westbranch Highway
Lewisburg, PA 17837
FP: 570-523-3600
WIC: 570-523-6666

Lewistown

99 North Juniata Street
Lewistown, PA 17044
FP: 717-248-0175
WIC: 717-248-5339

Selinsgrove

713 Bridge Street, Suite 7
Selinsgrove, PA 17870
FP: 570-372-0637
WIC: 570-374-8261

Shamokin

10 East Independence Street
Shamokin, PA 17872
FP: 570-648-0582
WIC: 570-648-1521

Sunbury

315 Market Street
Sunbury, PA 17801
WIC: 570-988-1945